The TPSeano Series: Potential Increase in Foreclosures if Temporary Protected Status Ends

Before the end of the year the Trump administration will be making decisions on the future of Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designations. This means that the lives of more than 325,000 people—including 250,000 Central American immigrants—now hang in the balance.

In this fourth installment of the TPSeano Series, we look at how ending TPS protections could impact the financial services industry. Our earlier posts in the series discussed the impact on the construction industrywhat temporary protected status is and what is at stake.

Temporary Protected Status foreclosures

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The TPSeano Series: Saving TPS and the 250,000 “TPSeanos” Living in Our Communities

By Carlos A. Guevara, Senior Policy Advisor, UnidosUS

Today, more than 250,000 TPSeanos from Central American are at risk of losing their protected status. In the next five months, the Trump administration will be making decisions on the future of temporary protected statues, or TPS, designations for the Central American countries. There is no official position by the administration with respect to the future of TPS designation for these countries, but recent remarks by senior officials do not bode well for the continued long-term future of protected status for these countries, even though major violence and human rights violations associated with civil strife in their home countries make it unsafe for them to return.

TPS beneficiaries are integral members of our communities. According to a July 2017 report by the Center for Migration Studies (CMS), TPS beneficiaries from the three largest TPS countries by population have an estimated 273,000 U.S.-born children, and 10% of Salvadoran and 6% Honduran TPS beneficiaries are married to legal residents. The report also finds that 87% of the TPS population from these countries speaks at least some English, and slightly over half speak English well, very well, or only English.

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