Beyond DREAMERS: DACAmented Homeowners Are Here to Stay

By Agatha So, Policy Analyst, UnidosUS

On September 5, the president announced that he would rescind the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Since 2012, DACA has provided hundreds of thousands of undocumented youth with opportunities to get an education and a good job without fear of deportation. The president’s announcement suddenly placed the lives of nearly 800,000 workers, students, and homeowners in the United States in limbo. Now, gains that these young immigrants were able to make due to the program are in jeopardy.

Homeownership is one of the many gains DACA recipients have achieved since the program began. In a 2015 survey of more than 1,700 DACA recipients, more than half reported getting their first credit card, and 12 percent had a mortgage or had their name on their family’s lease. DACA opened up opportunities for young immigrants to establish a formal record of work and credit history with a social security number, which they used to help them qualify for a loan to buy their first home. For DACA homeowners, their first home purchase was a dream shared by their families, and an important step towards financial stability and building family wealth.

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DACA Renewal Resources Are Available to You

If you haven’t heard by now, the president announced earlier this month that his administration would be rescinding the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, or DACA. The program, which for five years has transformed the lives of nearly 800,000 young people is no longer accepting new applications. However, when the administration announced that the program would begin to ‘wind down’ over a period of six months, they also shared that all current DACA recipients whose status and work permit would expire between September 5 (when the decision to end the program was announced) and March 5, 2018 (the date when the program, absent action by Congress, will end), are currently eligible to renew their DACA as long as their renewal application is received by the Department of Homeland Security prior to October 5.

UnidosUS is actively engaged in working on a legislative solution to this terrible problem the president has created, but if you’re a DACA recipient who needs to renew, we strongly urge you to do so now. Don’t delay. There will likely be no extension granted, so it’s imperative that you get your renewal application in before the deadline. And, our Affiliate Network is ready to help you do that.

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Enough is Enough!

A potential deal between Democrats and the president over how to fix DACA may have been announced late last night, but that didn’t stop hundreds of Latino activists, community leaders, and advocates from marching and rallying at the White House today to tell the Trump administration that on DACA and a host of other issues, “enough was enough.”

UnidosUS joined the rally, organized by the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, to join the call that our community will no longer tolerate the racist rhetoric that has become a defining feature of this young administration.

You too can join the action to show your solidarity with DREAMers. To start, go to unidos.us/heretostay and take our pledge to stand with DREAMers. When you do, you’ll become part of a growing network of advocates who are working to fight back against the forces of hate and bigotry.

And, don’t forget to follow us on social media. Find us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @weareunidosus.

What Does the Administration’s Decision to Rescind DACA Mean?

By Carlos A. Guevara, Senior Policy Advisor, UnidosUS

For the past five years, DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), a lawful and incredibly successful program, has transformed the lives of nearly 800,000 undocumented youth who came to the United States as young children. President Trump’s decision to end DACA means that hundreds of thousands of young people are now relying on Congress to come up with a bipartisan solution in order to ensure that they are not thrust back into the shadows.

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The TPSeano Series: Saving TPS and the 250,000 “TPSeanos” Living in Our Communities

By Carlos A. Guevara, Senior Policy Advisor, UnidosUS

Today, more than 250,000 TPSeanos from Central American are at risk of losing their protected status. In the next five months, the Trump administration will be making decisions on the future of temporary protected statues, or TPS, designations for the Central American countries. There is no official position by the administration with respect to the future of TPS designation for these countries, but recent remarks by senior officials do not bode well for the continued long-term future of protected status for these countries, even though major violence and human rights violations associated with civil strife in their home countries make it unsafe for them to return.

TPS beneficiaries are integral members of our communities. According to a July 2017 report by the Center for Migration Studies (CMS), TPS beneficiaries from the three largest TPS countries by population have an estimated 273,000 U.S.-born children, and 10% of Salvadoran and 6% Honduran TPS beneficiaries are married to legal residents. The report also finds that 87% of the TPS population from these countries speaks at least some English, and slightly over half speak English well, very well, or only English.

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